Dynamics of Apis mellifera Filamentous Virus (AmFV) Infections in Honey Bees and Relationships with Other Parasites



Apis mellifera filamentous virus (AmFV) is a large double stranded DNA virus
of honey bees, but its relationship with other parasites and prevalence are poorly known.
We analyzed individual honey bees from three colonies at different times post emergence in
order to monitor the dynamics of the AmFV gut colonization under natural conditions.
Prevalence and loads of microsporidia and trypanosomes were also recorded, as well as five
common honey bee RNA viruses. The results show that a high proportion of bees get infected
with AmFV during the first week post-emergence (75%) and that AmFV DNA levels
remained constant. A similar pattern was observed for microsporidia while trypanosomes
seem to require more time to colonize the gut. No significant associations between these
three infections were found, but significant positive correlations were observed between
AmFV and RNA viruses. In parallel, the prevalence of AmFV in France and Sweden was
assessed from pooled honey bee workers. The data indicate that AmFV is almost ubiquitous,
and does not seem to follow seasonal patterns, although higher viral loads were significantly
detected in spring. A high prevalence of AmFV was also found in winter bees, without
obvious impact on overwintering of the colonies.

 

Ulrike Hartmann, Eva Forsgren, Jean-Daniel Charrière, Peter Neumann and Laurent Gauthier (2015). Dynamics of Apis mellifera Filamentous Virus (AmFV) Infections in Honey Bees and Relationships with Other Parasites. Viruses 2015, 7, 2654-2667; doi:10.3390/v7052654

Hartmann-et-al-2015-Viruses-AmFV.pdf
http://www.mdpi.com/1999-4915/7/5/2654