The terpenes of leaves, pollen and nectar of...

Honey bees are highly prone to infectious diseases, causing colony losses in the worst case. However, they combat diseases through a combination of their innate immune system and social defence behaviours like foraging for health-enhancing plant products (e.g. nectar, pollen and resin). Plant secondary metabolites are not only highly active against bacteria and fungi, they…

Details

Comparative genomics and description of putative virulence factors...

In Europe, approximately 84% of cultivated crop species depend on insect pollinators, mainly bees. Apis mellifera (the Western honey bee) is the most important commercial pollinator worldwide. The Gram-positive bacterium Melissococcus plutonius is the causative agent of European foulbrood (EFB), a global honey bee brood disease. In order to detect putative virulence factors, we sequenced…

Details

Untimely loss of Philip McCabe

The president of Apimondia, Philip McCabe passed away this Saturday morning after a serious illness. He devoted much of his life to the wellbeing of honey bees and he cared for the interest of beekeepers, not only in Ireland but also worldwide. Until the end he was enormously active and acted as a role model…

Details

Sublethal effects of chronic exposure to CdO or...

Cadmium and lead-based nanotechnologies are increasingly used in agricultural, industrial, and biological processes; however, potential adverse effects of nanomaterials on honey bees had not been assessed. In this study, effects of exposures to sublethal concentrations of PbO and CdO nanoparticles (NPs), either separately or in combination on honey bee (Apis mellifera) workers, were assessed. Honey…

Details